Paediatrician

NMUH opens new children's ward following £4.4m investment

North Middlesex University Hospital (NMUH) NHS Trust opened a new children’s ward yesterday, following a £4.4m investment to improve facilities at the hospital.

The investment into the Paediatric Assessment Unit (PAU) aims to improve the care and experience for young patients and their families/carers coming to the hospital.

Patients will be able to access the unit more easily and quickly, helping reduce the amount of time they have to spend in hospital overall.

The new unit is located next to NMUH’s new Children’s Emergency Department (ED) and was redeveloped after a £1.4m investment last year.

Andy Heeps, interim Chief Executive of North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, said: I’m delighted to see the opening of our new paediatric unit for our young patients in Enfield, Haringey and north central London.

“We have one of the busiest children’s ED in London and this investment alongside the redevelopment of our new children’s ED will help us deliver better and improved care to meet the needs of our local communities.

“This investment has helped us to provide additional treatment space, reduce overcrowding, and further improve on robust infection control measures already in place. Not only will it make it easier for staff to provide safe care, but it will help us better support our community.”

Earlier this year the trust successfully bid for capital funds to improve the urgent and emergency care pathways. It enabled the trust to carry out a number of capital projects, including a new 20-bed ward named after Captain Sir Tom Moore, and to mark NMUH’s Centenary year.

The trust will be involved in five projects in total, including the new Captain Sir Tom Moore Centenary Ward, which will help the trust manage the demand arising from seasonal pressures, and restore services impacted by Covid-19.

As part of the projects, a new Emergency Department Assessment Unit (EDAU) opened in February. The unit has been redeveloped on the site of the old children’s emergency department. It provides extra capacity for streaming and assessing patients, so they can be seen more quickly.

A new Same Day Emergency Care (SDEC) unit also expanded the services provided for outpatients with additional examination, treatment and waiting facilities. The new SDEC will help reduce the need to admit people as inpatients, and prevent recurring attendances to the ED.

The projects will help the trust expand the services it provides to local communities, improving people’s care and patient experience.

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